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The Carnaby Jump And Dance


We can't remember where it got to in the charts. Mary's Walk. It sounds like it too! Our reunion created considerable interest, and as a result we discovered that our band was more popular than we realised. And so our public awaits us! The guitar riff is very similar in style to the Who's "Can't Explain" which had been a top 10 hit a few months earlier. We started to get The Carnaby Jump And Dance when Long John Baldry asked us to back him at various gigs.

The only transmitters of pop music other than radio Luxemburg at that time. We can't remember where it got to in the charts.

We enjoyed the success of having a minor hit with our first record, but. This prompted our agent Bryan Morrison to concentrate on promoting us outside of London.

As a result we spent most of our time travelling up and down the country in our old trusty J2 van in all winter weathers. By the spring of 66, we wanted to release a follow up single, but those who financed our promotion wanted us to keep on the road to establish a following outside of London, particularly in the North, before considering this.

We were far from happy with this, since apart from endless travel, we were not able to find the time to write new material. Things were becoming critical and disagreements with our manager didn't help.

But disaster was averted by a contract being offered by a South of France consortium for us to play all summer in their top clubs on the French Riviera. We jumped at this, ignored our manager a big mistake and headed south to St Tropez. We played all the top clubs in Nice, Cannes etc to packed venues. We were well paid and life was good. It seemed that a high proportion of our audience were made up from the London "in crowd" who spent their summers on the Med.

This good life was ultimately the kiss of death to our band. While we were living it up, we were not releasing a 2nd record, we were not promoting ourselves in the UK. To counter this our agent had lined up an even more extensive winter schedule for us to return to. This was something that none of us wanted. We decided that rather than that, we would on our return to the UK, go our separate ways. Only John had the sense to see that this might be a mistake, but even John didn't want to face another winter on the road.

We got back to the UK and followed our own chosen directions. At that time, the Carnaby was no more, and we all moved on. The original band members had been together for 4 years. Steve and I were the only 2 that stayed together musically, since although Kip wrote material, it was myself and Steve that produced most of the original songs.

Our song writing partnership stayed operational for many years up until the mid 70's. Together with other session musicians we released in the USA through UK Records in the early 70's in the name of " Sparky", Kip had moved to California, something he'd always said he wanted to do. Ron Drums , in the intervening years, had produced offspring who worked within the music industry.

I of course knew of Steve's whereabouts, and via Kip's family established a contact with him in California. John was harder to locate, but was found in the end via his nephew's band, where on a blog it mentioned his uncle John of the Carnaby. We decided to have a reunion in the Autumn of It was quite an event.

Kip flew in from LA to join the other resident UK members. We had also tracked down our manager Robert Orbach, Our roady Ivan Hicks later from Gardeners world fame and even the girls now in their 60's who ran our fan club around 40 people altogether.

It was a great event. A total surprise that firstly we were all still alive, Secondly, how successful we had all been in our chosen directions, and finally, how we had changed physically since the 60's Improved with age.

It was a great reunion celebration, and as a result, the suggestion was made that we should record and release once again. After sobering up, the idea still seemed to have some merit since all of us were still active musically, we had a complete stockpile of material written in the 60's, and the time and money to make all of this a reality.

We decided to do it, but to do it properly. This meant having to become familiar with digital recording. We employed professionals to bring us into the new age. It all went to the Tip. One London collector's shop used to get that a lot, the guy behind the counter knew of it but the boss was never told YankeeDisc 19th Nov I cannot agree with retribution against customers, after all, give most people the chance and they will try to "push the envelope" to gain a pecuniary advantage.

Later, when a company rep, I called at every Harlequin records outlet in the City of London, The West End, and Kings Road, and some very inventive people frequented their branches Some people are pathetic it seems Not so many 45rpm covers like this were made. Also LPs had taped-stickered shop info on the back cover, Harlequin in London did this often as did a few other London shops.

There was a reason why record retailers defaced records All record stores had customers who would buy a single, take it home, tape it, bring it back, and then say, "my mum had already bought me that, so I'll choose another one I'm sure some members out there could regale us with how they got to exchange records they did not want I personally never did that, didn't see the point.

Most dealers didn't deface records but stamped or wrote inside EP or LP sleeves to identify their own original stock, and would take back genuinely faulty product. Singles were much more tricky, and if you sold a single in a custom UK die-cut paper sleeve, like HMV, Stateside, or Tamla-Motown, you could make your own identifying mark on the sleeve, and as often the record came back the same day, you could identify what was yours and what was not.

Trouble is, sometimes the little darlings brought the record back in a completely different sleeve As a manager, I had to deal with all the complaints that the staff passed the buck to me on, and there was a young scroat who was always buying 45s and bringing them back, obviously after taping them.

One day he said " Okay, bring back the copy that Auntie brought to your house for your birthday today, so that I can see you have two copies of the same single, and I will exchange the one you bought from my staff If I'd found a shop that defaces new items with their advert sticker, I'd buy elsewhere!

VinylSid 19th Nov This record was on my wants list for only a week until I got it! Anyone who has bettered that on first hearing a single before buying it? Juke Jules 3rd Aug ZebedyZak 20th Jul



We were far from happy with this, since apart from endless travel, we were not able to find the time to write new material. Things were becoming critical and disagreements with our manager didn't help. But disaster was averted by a contract being offered by a South of France consortium for us to play all summer in their top clubs on the French Riviera.

We jumped at this, ignored our manager a big mistake and headed south to St Tropez. We played all the top clubs in Nice, Cannes etc to packed venues. We were well paid and life was good. It seemed that a high proportion of our audience were made up from the London "in crowd" who spent their summers on the Med. This good life was ultimately the kiss of death to our band. While we were living it up, we were not releasing a 2nd record, we were not promoting ourselves in the UK.

To counter this our agent had lined up an even more extensive winter schedule for us to return to. This was something that none of us wanted. We decided that rather than that, we would on our return to the UK, go our separate ways. Only John had the sense to see that this might be a mistake, but even John didn't want to face another winter on the road. We got back to the UK and followed our own chosen directions.

At that time, the Carnaby was no more, and we all moved on. The original band members had been together for 4 years. Steve and I were the only 2 that stayed together musically, since although Kip wrote material, it was myself and Steve that produced most of the original songs.

Our song writing partnership stayed operational for many years up until the mid 70's. Together with other session musicians we released in the USA through UK Records in the early 70's in the name of " Sparky", Kip had moved to California, something he'd always said he wanted to do. Ron Drums , in the intervening years, had produced offspring who worked within the music industry.

I of course knew of Steve's whereabouts, and via Kip's family established a contact with him in California. John was harder to locate, but was found in the end via his nephew's band, where on a blog it mentioned his uncle John of the Carnaby. We decided to have a reunion in the Autumn of It was quite an event. Kip flew in from LA to join the other resident UK members.

We had also tracked down our manager Robert Orbach, Our roady Ivan Hicks later from Gardeners world fame and even the girls now in their 60's who ran our fan club around 40 people altogether. It was a great event. A total surprise that firstly we were all still alive, Secondly, how successful we had all been in our chosen directions, and finally, how we had changed physically since the 60's Improved with age.

It was a great reunion celebration, and as a result, the suggestion was made that we should record and release once again. After sobering up, the idea still seemed to have some merit since all of us were still active musically, we had a complete stockpile of material written in the 60's, and the time and money to make all of this a reality.

We decided to do it, but to do it properly. This meant having to become familiar with digital recording. We employed professionals to bring us into the new age. We went ahead and had our own state of the art recording studio built, which we lovingly refer to as " Shabbey Road". This was completed in early , when tracks started to be laid down.

Our reunion created considerable interest, and as a result we discovered that our band was more popular than we realised.

It was a surprise to discover that we feature on at least 15 compilation albums of 60's music. Also, acetates, and old tapes of recording sessions long forgotten have emerged to allow us to rework.

It was these discoveries that spurred us into recent action. Also LPs had taped-stickered shop info on the back cover, Harlequin in London did this often as did a few other London shops. There was a reason why record retailers defaced records All record stores had customers who would buy a single, take it home, tape it, bring it back, and then say, "my mum had already bought me that, so I'll choose another one I'm sure some members out there could regale us with how they got to exchange records they did not want I personally never did that, didn't see the point.

Most dealers didn't deface records but stamped or wrote inside EP or LP sleeves to identify their own original stock, and would take back genuinely faulty product. Singles were much more tricky, and if you sold a single in a custom UK die-cut paper sleeve, like HMV, Stateside, or Tamla-Motown, you could make your own identifying mark on the sleeve, and as often the record came back the same day, you could identify what was yours and what was not.

Trouble is, sometimes the little darlings brought the record back in a completely different sleeve As a manager, I had to deal with all the complaints that the staff passed the buck to me on, and there was a young scroat who was always buying 45s and bringing them back, obviously after taping them.

One day he said " Okay, bring back the copy that Auntie brought to your house for your birthday today, so that I can see you have two copies of the same single, and I will exchange the one you bought from my staff If I'd found a shop that defaces new items with their advert sticker, I'd buy elsewhere!

VinylSid 19th Nov This record was on my wants list for only a week until I got it! Anyone who has bettered that on first hearing a single before buying it? Juke Jules 3rd Aug ZebedyZak 20th Jul I first heard "Jump And Dance" on the Rubble compilation. I started collecting those in The guitar riff is very similar in style to the Who's "Can't Explain" which had been a top 10 hit a few months earlier. I haven't heard the B-side, it wasn't on the Rubble compilation.

The single didn't chart and is consequently hard to get now. Dr Doom 28th Sep It sounds like it too!



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Mojo Presents Maximum '65 - Acceda a todos los álbumes de música y los mejores Temas en vídeos de The Carnaby aqui en Frogtoon Music. Mejores Temas incluyen: Jump and Dance, Jump & Dance, I Don't Deserve A Girl Like You, 19 - I Don't Deserve A Girl Like You (Audition Tape) ('67), Jump And Dance, Purple Haze Extended, I Don't Deserve A Girl Like You (Audition Tape) ('67), I Don't. Chords for The Carnaby - Jump And Dance.: F#, B, A, E. Play along with guitar, ukulele, or piano with interactive chords and diagrams. Includes transpose, capo hints, changing speed and much more. Jun 01,  · Discover releases, reviews, credits, songs, and more about The Carnaby - Jump And Dance at Discogs. Complete your The Carnaby collection/5(19).