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Primus Tales From The Punchbowl


Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. Retrieved September 30, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Blaileen picked on one slower kid, and the adventures of Donny take place throughout the song. I think best viewed with the video, which is probably my favorite Primus video.

In his review for AllMusic , Daniel Gioffre describes the album as "unabashed prog rock Tales from the Punchbowl was nearly as successful as Pork Soda , and peaked at number eight on the Billboard , making it Primus' second-highest chart position. All lyrics are written by Les Claypool ; all music is composed by Primus. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article needs additional citations for verification.

Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. Blaileen " Released: " Southbound Pachyderm " Released: Retrieved October 23, Boston Globe. Retrieved Retrieved April 8, Rolling Stone Magazine. Retrieved September 30, Chicago Tribune. The solo in the middle ain't too shabby, and kinda brings Primus away from that angry tone and makes it fun again.

Also, the echoing of vocals can be uite eerie. However, something about this song just loses it's natural Primusness. The sound of the song is very upbeat and fun, with the combination of Ler's yelping and Ler's guitar.

The lyrics talk about Wynona's caged beaver and his shenanigans. Though it's a fun song, again I think it's just missing what makes Primus, well, Primus.

Les strums the bass a whole heck of a lot more than usual, and the song is very chill for the most part. The quietness is often interrupted by minor thrashes of the guitar, and then the song hits full swing.

It gives you a slightly sad feeling, as Les' voice elevates at the end of the each line, paired with his quiet vocals. I think best viewed with the video, which is probably my favorite Primus video. It's only flaw is it's length, which could be downtoned for the casual Primus listener.

It's one of those things that makes Primus so strange, though easily skipped by any listener, no matter how hardcore. Ler's guitar compliments the vocals nicely, and even hold their own as the song chugs along. I think the song is far too long, though I do like the alternating 'bum, bum' of the bassline during the song. The lyrics make little sense as the guitar makes a lot of carhorn type sounds, and sounds a bit like the guitar part in Wynona's Big Brown Beaver.

The drums are thumping and demadning, as Les does his thing. Les is playing his upright, and just doing a grim thing.

The song is dark sounding, as the guitar makes a spooky pattern during the chorus. The song kind of gets boring after a few minutes, with the lyrics detaling a predicament of sorts. A man pays for a 'show' of sorts, only to realize one of the women is his former love.

Probably the closest thing to a love song for Primus, actually. Les' exclamations during the song about a Christmas tree seller make this a nice song, and one of the best on the album. Quite a catchy tune with a distant sounding Les as he plucks on his bass, detaling some of his old friends. I like the ditty myself, though I'm sure many skip it.

The song is pretty grim, with the bass sticking to the lower notes, and the guitar kinda spewing out a few notes every few moments, and the drum just pounding and pounding. I like the song, and it's very chill. They are very similiar in length, and the song is a fun piece, but again it's length is it's downfall.

I like the solo, and the fast beat it keeps throughout the whole of the song. There's a nice little bass part and Les' random noises in the background that seem to echo. There's also a loud assault on your ears with who know's what. Something that nobody probably skips, for it's the end of the album. Primus ' musicianship continues to improve, with the intonation of Les Claypool 's trademark fretless bass a sore spot in the past more spot-on than ever, and guitarist Larry LaLonde 's Fripp-isms are truly convincing for the first time.

The funk influences that have always been hinted at on previous Primus records seem more convincing here, as Claypool and drummer Tim "Herb" Alexander lay down some extremely grooving figures, as on the Red Hot Chili Peppers-esque "chorus" to "Mrs.

His dissonances seem a bit more calculated and less gratuitous and lazy than they often came off before. With high energy and full of surprises, Tales From the Punchbowl is one of Primus ' finer discs.

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Views Read Edit View history. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. June 6, [1]. Progressive rock [2] [3].

Interscope , Prawn Song. Pork Soda Tales from the Punchbowl Brown Album Christgau's Consumer Guide. B [8]. Anyhow, some of the songs on here are amongst the best Primus songs I've heard, but others are extremely weak. I like Frizzle Fry a lot better, personally. Baileen is my favourite off this album, but I really dislike this album.

Album Rating: 2. With a band like Primus who plays the same stuff over and over again, this album doesn't stand out at all. This album is clearly not the best, but I suppose to Primus fans it is enjoyable. Nutterbutter is probably my favourite song off it. Antipop is probably Primus's weakest album. Decent review, but your track descriptions are a bit rudimentary and only get shorter towards the end. Primus Tales from the Punchbowl 3. The basic story of the song is Professor Nutterbutter who gives out candy and the like to everyone in town.

Thought it is a tad long, and part of the song Les is mumbling some undecipherable mumbo jumbo about worms, it's still a fun intro to the cd. Blaileen Now this song is another wacky Primus-y lyrical song, with lyrics that branch off from one story to another.

Blaileen picked on one slower kid, and the adventures of Donny take place throughout the song. The sound of the song is a bit grim with the bass and guitar combining to creat booms, and Ler does this repetitive angry static thing in the background.

The solo in the middle ain't too shabby, and kinda brings Primus away from that angry tone and makes it fun again. Also, the echoing of vocals can be uite eerie. However, something about this song just loses it's natural Primusness. The sound of the song is very upbeat and fun, with the combination of Ler's yelping and Ler's guitar.

The lyrics talk about Wynona's caged beaver and his shenanigans. Though it's a fun song, again I think it's just missing what makes Primus, well, Primus. Les strums the bass a whole heck of a lot more than usual, and the song is very chill for the most part. The quietness is often interrupted by minor thrashes of the guitar, and then the song hits full swing. It gives you a slightly sad feeling, as Les' voice elevates at the end of the each line, paired with his quiet vocals.

I think best viewed with the video, which is probably my favorite Primus video. It's only flaw is it's length, which could be downtoned for the casual Primus listener. It's one of those things that makes Primus so strange, though easily skipped by any listener, no matter how hardcore. Ler's guitar compliments the vocals nicely, and even hold their own as the song chugs along. I think the song is far too long, though I do like the alternating 'bum, bum' of the bassline during the song.

The lyrics make little sense as the guitar makes a lot of carhorn type sounds, and sounds a bit like the guitar part in Wynona's Big Brown Beaver. The drums are thumping and demadning, as Les does his thing. Drinking Hanging Out In Love. Introspection Late Night Partying. Rainy Day Relaxation Road Trip. Romantic Evening Sex All Themes. Features Interviews Lists.

Streams Videos All Posts. Recording Date November, - March, Track Listing. Professor Nutbutter's House of Treats. Wynona's Big Brown Beaver.

Southbound Pachyderm.



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Dec 06,  · and the album Tales from the Punchbowl refers to the LSD-spiked punch that was frequently served at Barrington social events. Claypool later recorded a song called "Barrington Hall" with his band Frog Brigade/5(88). The introduction track to Tales of the Punchbowl is a nice little blend of what sounds to be a live audience and wacky lyrics, with some interesting alternating parts between Les and Ler. The basic story of the song is Professor Nutterbutter who gives out candy and the like to everyone in town. Tales from the Punchbowl is the fourth studio album by the American rock band Primus, released on June 6, It was the band's last album with Tim Alexander before he rejoined Primus seven years later, and again in September [4]Genre: Progressive rock.